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Morton's Neuroma

Symptoms of Morton's Neuroma

mortons neuroma treatment in the Farmington, MI 48335 and Berkley, MI 48072 areaThe pain caused by Morton’s neuroma is typically experienced at the ball of the foot. Many have described the sensation as feeling like they have a pebble stuck in their shoe. Because of this, those with the condition may find walking to be more difficult and uncomfortable. They may also experience a numbing or burning sensation in the foot. One of the most common factors that influence the development of Morton’s neuroma is improper footwear. Those who generally wear tightly fitted shoes or shoes with higher heels are more at risk at getting Morton’s neuroma. Having a foot abnormality may also increase the risk of getting this condition, as it may cause instability, thus adding more pressure onto the nerves of the foot. Certain foot conditions such as bunions, hammertoes, and flat flat feet have also been known to lead to Morton’s neuroma if not treated promptly.

Causes of Morton’s neuroma

Neuromas can be caused by anything that causes compression or irritation of the nerve. A common cause is wearing shoes with tapered toe boxes or high heels that force the toes into the toe boxes. Physical activities that involve repeated pressure to the foot, such as running or basketball, can also create neuromas. Those with foot deformities, such as bunions, hammertoes, or flat feet, are more likely to develop the condition.

Athletes have a tendency of getting Morton’s neuroma due to repetitive motions and pressure placed on the ball of the foot while running or jumping. Morton’s neuroma may also develop as a result of an injury to the foot.

Visit Podiatrist

Persistent foot pain should always be a concern. The foot should be examined by a podiatrist if pain persists longer than a few days with no relief from changing shoes, or relieving stress from the foot. The earlier the foot is examined and treated, the less chance there will be for needing surgical treatment.

To learn more about Morton’s neuroma and treatments that work best for your case, consult with your podiatrist.

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